Archive | November, 2011

Ethiopia denies crossing into Somalia – sounds familiar, but why the shenanigan again?

23 Nov

By Keffyalew Gebremedhin

Why deny the obvious, perhaps a necessary evil?

As a matter of habit, Ethiopia is in denial again about dispatching a sizable force across into Somalia nearly a week ago. This is not the first time Ethiopia has been equivocal about such actions. For instance, in November 2006 it did exactly that, even after the world knew and the international media actually rightly reported the presence of Ethiopian forces and by then had already tasted a few major battles in that country.
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Tahrir Square is aiming at rolling another head

23 Nov

By Keffyalew Gebremedhin

Today, thousands of Egyptians thronged in the historic Tahrir Square with fury to vent their anger and utter distrust of the once adored Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF), which took power after Mubarak was pushed out of office in February 2011.
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Presumption of Innocence: Are We Ignoring Key Legal Principle?

23 Nov

By Seble Teweldebirhan

Addis Ababa (Ezega.com) – Presumption of innocence, which states that the accused has a right to be presumed innocence before proven guilty by the court of law, is one of the core principles of any legal system. This principle is also one of the fundamental human rights incorporated in international human rights instruments and national constitutions. In addition to its obligation under international human rights instruments, as a country, Ethiopia also incorporates this core principle under its constitution which states that “an accused person has the right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty according to the law.’’
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In Ethiopia, Food Insecurity is About More Than Just Famine

23 Nov

By Marianna Gomez, From CLIP–COMMON LANGUAGE PROJECT

Photo: Marianna Gomez

When I first came to Ethiopia, I expected to see famine, or at least hear people talk about it. I had long associated Ethiopia with footage of starving children from the 1980s. There have been at least three other famines here since then—in 1993, 2002 and 2006—and this year the Horn of Africa is in the news again for famine.
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Yenesew’s self-immolation: The ultimate call for justice

18 Nov

by Jawar Mohammed

The self-immolation of Ethiopian high school teacher, Yenesew Gebre, 29, signals a clear message to Ethiopian leaders and their international supporters. In Ethiopian politics, practically everything is contested, a contest that has often taken an ugly face leading to arrests, tortures and disappearances of dissidents. The growing clampdown on dissent targets leaders of opposition political parties, activists, and even bystanders with no clear association with what the government alleges to be their offense. But self-immolation in a society known for its unbreakable faith, and perseverance has shaken the social conscience of many.
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Ethiopia & Slovakia’s diplomatic relations downgraded; Slovak envoy’s two nights in prison cell exposes Addis Abeba’s regression

17 Nov

By Keffyalew Gebremedhin

Slovakia has recalled its ambassador from Addis Ababa, following his release from Ethiopian prison where he spent November 5-6, despite protestations and his status as a diplomat. He was released Monday 7 November, after intervention by European diplomats.
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TEACHER TORCHES HIMSELF TO HIS DEATH IN PROTEST AGAINST INJUSTICE IN ETHIOPIA

16 Nov

By Angus Stickler (Bureau of Investigative Journalism), November 15, 2011

Events in Ethiopia have taken a disturbing turn following reports that ateacher in his late 20s burnt himself alive last week in protest against the ongoing brutal clampdown on dissent in the country. According to reports Yenesew Gebre made an impassioned plea at a protest gathering before dowsing himself in petrol and setting himself on fire.
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