Tag Archives: Hosni Mubarak

Mubarak’s sons released day after 4th anniversary of revolution

26 Jan

Posted by The Ethiopia Observatory (TEO)

CAIRO (Reuters) – The sons of deposed Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak were released from prison on Monday, prison officials said, a day after the violent anniversary of the 2011 uprising that toppled the autocrat.
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Egypt has traversed long distances to find some comfort in on-going construction of Ethiopia’s Nile dam

11 Nov

The Egyptian delegation during the fifth joint Egyptian-Ethiopian Committee (Credit: Al-Ahram Weekly)


 

By Keffyalew Gebremedhin – The Ethiopia Observatory (TEO)

When I read Monday evening (Nov. 10) the one-paragraph story on Addis Fortune, titled The Construction of Ethiopia’s Grand Renaissance Dam Will Cause No Harm to Egypt, attributed to Foreign Minister Sameh Shukri, I was not certain how to take it. After all, it is just a quote from Addis Zemen, the Amharic daily, where TPLF-owned Ethiopian papers are given to promoting the Front’s propaganda, instead of writing information the people can read.
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Protests, clashes all over Egypt on revolution’s anniversary

25 Jan

A general view is seen as protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans at Tahrir Square in Cairo January 25, 2013 (Photo: Reuters)

A general view is seen as protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans at Tahrir Square in Cairo January 25, 2013 (Photo: Reuters)


 
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Political changes roil balance of power & proliferation of competing demands over Nile

4 Sep

By Carolyine Lamere, Source: NewSecurityBeat

In 1979, Egyptian President Anwar Sadat famously said that “the only matter that could take Egypt to war again is water.” Sadat’s message was clear: the Nile is a matter of national security for Egypt.
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Egypt: Food for a Revolution

7 Apr

By Sandy Tolan and Charlotte Buchen

In 2008, three years before Egyptians rose up against President Hosni Mubarak, the global food crisis provided a hint of what was to come. As world oil prices rose and Western countries planted ever more acres for biofuels instead of people, food prices skyrocketed. Suddenly, cooking oil, tomatoes, lentils, rice and even bread soared out of reach for many families. Riots and protests broke out around the world. In Egypt, fights erupted in the subsidised bread lines and five Egyptians died in the clashes. Three years later, memories of 2008 were still fresh: groundwork for the revolution.
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